Are you a sci-fi and/or fantasy fan, and why?

Discussion in 'THE AIGBURTH ARMS' started by jmc2000, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. jmc2000

    jmc2000 Deck Sergeant

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    I don't actually think this is too stupid a question here, as a lot of Dwarf fans seem to be sitcom/humour fans rather than sci-fi diehards.

    When I was young, my favourite genre was a toss-up between sci-fi and fantasy. Virtually all of my reading was fantasy. I actually read very little sci-fi, but Red Dwarf and Hitchhiker's Guide were (still are!) two of my favourite franchises.

    I would actually say I've lost interest in both genres, other than the two series I named and Doctor Who. I no longer consider myself much of a fantasy or sci-fi fan, and have never bothered watching Game of Thrones.

    Part of the problem was, I think most of my passion for speculative fiction was the idea of being immersed in another world. E.g., "Wouldn't it be amazing to look up and see a dragon? Wouldn't it be amazing to look up and see two suns?" As I grew up, it dawned on me that another world would just feel normal if you actually lived in it. There's stuff in the real world that's every bit as amazing as sci-fi and fantasy - the blue whale, long haul flights, electric lighting, etc. - but we don't go around thinking "wow, isn't this amazing" unless we make a conscious effort to. If I lived in a fantasy world with two suns and dragons, I would probably spend most of my time feeling annoyed because I went to town and forgot to pick up sunscreen, and then maybe watch half of a David Attenborough about dragons before getting bored and putting QI on.

    Being in another world (or time) wouldn't necessarily mean doing something interesting. E.g., in the 80s, if a sci-fi hero got a message on a portable communicator, I would think, oh my god, wouldn't that be amazing. But I sort of took it for granted that, if I had such a device, I would be getting messages about how aliens were attacking, so I could jump in my spaceship and fly off to fight them. I now live in a future where I get messages on my portable communicator (which is twice as fancy as the ones in 80s sci-fi), but it's mostly just my mum asking how I am. So I eventually realised that, if I lived in Middle Earth or on a spaceship, I wouldn't get invited on many adventures, and would probably find the lack of home comforts really inconvenient. Admittedly, most of the fantasy/sci-fi is about people who do do interesting things - but I came round to the idea that there's enough of that in the real world, and you don't have to invent another one to have a good story.

    Nowadays, my favourite genre is detective fiction. Do you consider yourself a sci-fi and fantasy fan, and what's your favourite genre?
     
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  2. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    I lije film noir detective diction movies, read any Raymond chandler? I'm another sitcom fan
     
  3. FeeBee

    FeeBee Deck Sergeant

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    I love both sci-fi and fantasy but I am so much fussier with science fiction then I am with fantasy. Books I certainly read a lot more fantasy then I do science fiction and it really annoys me that the likes of audible just bundles them both together because while I enjoy them both and they have elements that cross over I don't consider them the same.

    Sci-fi I don't even watch that much these day, very fussy about what I like and don't watch much TV in general of but I certainly watch more sci-fi shows then I do fantasy based shows.

    I dislike sci-fi that goes into the horror realm. So many times I thought that I was watching a normal sci-fi for it to turn out to be sci-fi horror.

    Gaming I lean towards the fantasy based games over sci-fi.
     
  4. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    That's funny, as a horror fan, I don't really like horror that delves into sci-fi. I guess both sets of fans can be quite purist in their outlooks
     
  5. FeeBee

    FeeBee Deck Sergeant

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    Yet I am happy to play sci-fi computer games that go into horror 7 Days a Skeptic comes to mind. Not sure if I ever finished that game. The other game I played by that author was that I did complete was 5 Days a Stranger which was pure horror and the same concept and gameplay style.
     
  6. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Yeah, well you're a witch
     
  7. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Much more a Science Fiction kind of guy. Fantasy?...... I like it but can take it or leave it. Started being a serious and voracious reader at a early age. Got started smack in the middle of Science fictions "Silver Age" so was exposed to its riches. I liked it then, and now, because it offers a look at how things could be, good and bad. Old school S.F. was very optimistic generally about humankinds future but cautionary tales abounded too. GOOD Solid Science Fiction can make you think much deeper thoughts about the human condition than you thought yourself capable of. Read "Stranger in a Strange Land" by Robert Heinlein and you will be entertained and moved. Read it again 6 months later and as you read about Valentine Smiths reactions to being "brought home" you'll think man, he's right! Read "The Cold Equations" by Tom Godwin and see if you CAN'T think about morality. Of what is fundamentally right or wrong and to what degree do you compromise those two concepts? Read "Inconstant Moon" by Larry Niven and I defy you to not think about just how fragile our planet truly is.

    Science Fiction can also be a good detective story. "The Mote In Gods Eye" by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle is an outstanding example by two masters of S.F.. Can YOU figure out what the Moties are up to? The clues are all right there in front of you, an excellent read.

    Bad guys? You want monsters? Lol, Science Fiction has them by the truck load and in every shape, density, and element you can think of. But it also offers such real terrors as "The Beserkers" by Fred Saberhagen. Think Borg without the human element, thinking, self replicating, mindless, merciless killing entities on a universe wide mission to exterminate all "badlife" i.e. intelligence. (many years before S.T.:T.N.G. by the way)
     
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  8. Underdunn

    Underdunn Catering Officer

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    Fantasy can suck it.
     
  9. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    Nor me! What are the chances the only two people on Earth never to have watched Game of Thrones are using the same forum?

    And lemurs! Don't forget them. We should go around thinking it's amazing. I do all the time. I'm using a smartphone now that I frequently think is amazing. I've been utterly wowed by Blue Planet II. I don't think I take any of the amazing aspects of our world for granted, and for me that feeds into fantasy ideas. I've often thought about how cool it would be to see David Attenborough's take on dragons or krakens in a world in which they existed.

    I used to read a fair bit of science fiction and fantasy, but I no longer read fiction. Like you say, the world in which we live is frequently mind blowing. But I still love to watch science fiction and fantasy. I began watching Red Dwarf when it started in the eighties, and back then I loved both science fiction and sitcom, so it was a perfect match. I've probably stuck with it beyond the length of time I would a normal sitcom because of its science fiction themes.
     

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