British/American Idioms, Phrases and Slang

Discussion in 'THE AIGBURTH ARMS' started by BigOleDummy, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    As Oscar Wilde said and paraphrased by Mallory Brown "England and America are two countries separated by the same language". I've had a few instances where I just don't get some of your phrases/words/references . Most I can figure out due to the context but others just leave me scratching my head.

    1. Hoovering - I assume this means vacuuming. Hoover is a brand of vacuum cleaner but far from the only one. Does this in fact mean vacuuming or a certain kind of clean up or something else entirely?
    2. Git - from all the context I've figured out that this is an insult. But why and where did it originate?
    3. Twat - No clue what you all mean when you say it. HERE its a semi or totally vulgar reference to female genitalia. A slightly less odious C***.
    4. Smeg - I know its bad but is it just a red Dwarf thing or is it more generally used term over there? Is it in fact derived from "Smegma"?

    Those are a few just off the top of my head I've wondered about. are there any American phrases/idioms you don't get? For instance, my "location" at the moment is "In the Doghouse". That's a very common way of saying "I've screwed up, I'm embarrassed about it so I'm lying low for awhile" Did that meaning come through to you all?
     
  2. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator Warned

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    You're correct in all your assumptions twat can also mean to hit something, as in Listers twat it. Hoovering means vacuuming , both the same. Git I imagine, comes from the slight alteration of get, an old fashioned insult. Smeg means smegma, I take it, and is a BBC friendly alternative to fxxk. It's never used that way, but since red dwarf come on TV it has being adopted by some fans, but it only tends to be fans who use it in everyday use, as a rule
     
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  3. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator Warned

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    We know in the doghouse, and it's often used over here. Do you knownthese words?

    Dick, to mean penis

    Wxnkers, an insult, swap the X for an a

    Minge, to mean female genitalia

    Do you know the foods

    Tripe
    Steak and kidney pudding, not pie, pudding
    Chips and gravy
    Marmite
    Bovril
    OXO
    Yorkshire pudding
    Creamed rice with jam
    Hp or daddies sauce
     
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  4. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator Warned

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    I could really confuse you and say this phrase which use a local dialect, even a lot of Brits will have difficulty understanding what this means

    Cost kick a bo againt a wo an' then 'it it wi' thi yed till it bosses?"
     
  5. Ant E

    Ant E Flight Co-Ordinator

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    "reach out"

    I HATE that phrase!!! We "reached out to....".
     
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  6. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Yes ,dick means the same here along with johnson, pud (for an especially small one)

    Tripe has two meanings here, pig intestines that some people actually EAT!!!!!!!! (yuk yuk vomit) and something just too silly/dumb to consider, as in "what kind of tripe are you saying"?
    To us over here a pudding is a sweet dessert and nothing else. The THOUGHT of a pudding that's not chocolate or vanilla etc. just makes me retch actually.
    Chips and gravy I'm assuming is creamed chipped beef on toast? That's how we use it. Its GOOD too ,YUM!
    We don't use wxnkers at all in any context I can think of. Now....... masturbation is sometimes called wxnking off, but even that is rare as other words are used much more often.
    Marmite I know is some kind of food but I would hazard a guess that not more than a percentage point or two of Americans know this.
    Bovil , never seen the word before.
    OXO , kisses and hugs?
    Yorkshire pudding , while I've heard/read about it I have no clue what it is. If its another non-dessert pudding then I'm sure its as gross as a Haggis.
    Creamed rice with jam , no but it sounds edible at least. Wait... what kind of "cream"?
    Hp or daddys sause. Nope never heard of it.

    As for ......
    All I can say is "WHAT"?
     
  7. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    I actually agree with you about that, its just sounds so....... condescending and elitist I guess is the word I'm looking for.
     
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  8. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator Warned

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    Chips and gravy, is chips, our equivalent of French fries, and gravy, a meat juiced based kind of thin sauce, sort of. Creamed rice is rice pudding. Which is sweet rice cooked in cream or milk with a spoon of jam, or jello stirred into it. Yorkshire pudding isn't a pudding as such, it's more a batter baked in a tray, and steak and kidney pudding uses a savoury pastry that is boiled not baked
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2018
  9. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator Warned

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    Bovril, not bovil, my spelling mistake, is a thick yeasty beefy extract that is drank as a beverage with hot water added. OXO is a brand name and is the aforementioned gravy in a granular cube form
     
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  10. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator Warned

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    Yorkshire pudding is awesome, you really want and need to try it. It's nothng like haggis, which is horrid. It's not really a pudding at all in fact. Also do you have mushy peas over there?
     
  11. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    That sounds terrible! So its really just a broth when you get down to it?

    I could maybe try Yorkshire pudding ...... maybe, the fact that its got "pudding" in its name but isn't a sweet dessert is like 2 strikes against it though I must admit. Mushy peas I've never heard of though I do like peas, but no we don't smash them up. Sounds like a baby food actually.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Abe

    Abe Deck Sergeant

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    I've known about bovril forever - a game I played since I was two called "shopping list" (bit memory-esque) contains bovril on one of the lists/tokens.
     
  13. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    :redface: Never heard of either Bovril or a game named "shopping list" until today :redface:
     
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  14. Kittypaws

    Kittypaws Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Say what now in the who now? :eek:
     
  15. Kittypaws

    Kittypaws Flight Co-Ordinator

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    The word smeg comes from, um, smegma, but I'd be too embarrassed to explain it...
     
  16. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Glad I'm not the ONLY one....................... :-S
     
  17. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Thought so....... and I know what that is. My Health teacher in 7th grade wasn't shy about ANYTHING! Just a little surprised it made it on British T.V. Always kind of though the BBC was pretty staid, but now that I really think about it... "Are You Being Served" had some pretty saucy word play didn't it?
     
  18. Pembers

    Pembers Console Officer

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    Let’s touch base before close of play.
     
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  19. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Yeah, that's another one (or two!).
     
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  20. Pembers

    Pembers Console Officer

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    Well close of play is borrowed from a days cricket, basically means end of the working day. Touch base means get in touch with each other basically.
     
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