British/American Idioms, Phrases and Slang

Discussion in 'THE AIGBURTH ARMS' started by BigOleDummy, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. Abe

    Abe Deck Sergeant

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    We know, we have touch base out here. I don't know why anybody would have any problem with that or reaching out.
     
  2. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Its just so worn out and.......... I don't know ..... I mean its just the way its said I guess. "Touch base" why not check in or I need to see or any myriad others. "Reaching out" .... what's wrong with ask?
     
  3. Bluey

    Bluey Science Officer

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    I don't think Rob and Doug got smeg from smegma. At least, I don't think I've ever heard either of them state that they did. In fact, in an interview many years ago Rob Grant denied the word had any link to smegma. I think they just came up with it randomly after deciding to create a futuristic swear word.
     
  4. Abe

    Abe Deck Sergeant

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    I find them all to have slightly different situations in which they are most proper, but all those do work, I guess.
     
  5. jmc2000

    jmc2000 Deck Sergeant

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    "Check in" was once a novel figure of speech too :-) In a few decades, people will probably be saying: "Argh, I hate the phrase '[whatever]'. What's wrong with a good old-fashioned phrase like 'touch base'?!"
     
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  6. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    I guess you have a point there but still .......... using new phrases/words for established needs just seems unnecessary to me. English is reputed to be one of the harder languages to learn for non-native speakers anyway and I see some of what we now use as dated as "Groovy". Freddy , a German friend of mine used to get SO frustrated when I tried to explain American expressions and word usage to him. He spoke excellent English by the way.

    Anyway, this thread has drifted away from my original intention somewhat but that's cool :-)-D see what I did there?!) Language, its roots and evolution has long fascinated me and the differences between British English and American English, not to mention Australian , Canadian , and New Zealand English is something I've thought about for years.
     
  7. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    I suspect you'll remember mid Atlantic American big ole, being a fan of film noir and films of the period that is. That was a strange one. I imagine it started because Yanks have a thing for the English and its class system, therefore the more upper class ones among you tried to affect it, in an effort to seem more sophisticated, it was an odd thing anyway, and was prevalent in a lot of US movies of the 40s and 50s. Weirdly enough, a lot of British dj's adopted it, because they wanted to sound like their American DJ counterparts
     
  8. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Cost kick a bo againt a wo an' then 'it it wi' thi yed till it bosses?"

    can you kick a ball against a wall then hit it with your head till it bursts

    Stoke dialect

    The correct reply is 'aye, cost yeow?'

    yes can you?
     
  9. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    what about 'there's nowt will cum from 'owt what mithering cluuterbucks don't barley grummit'
     
  10. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Ah hab nary idear wut yawl jus sayid.

    (I have no idea what you just said - Southern U.S. dialect of English)
     
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  11. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    there' s nothing will come from anything that moaning idiots don't barely understand
     
  12. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    some struggle with Southern U.S dialect, but I find it fairly easily since I grew up adoring Tom Sawyer and br'er rabbit
     
  13. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Samuel Clemens is one of the best American authors we've ever produced imho. Do yourself a favor and read "Life on the Mississippi", "The Innocents Abroad" and "Roughing It". Please note that although written in 1869 "Innocents Abroad" is STILL spot on as an observation of how way too many Americans view and act when they first see the world.

    If you don't want to go to the Library, most of his writings are online free, courtesy of the Gutenberg Project. Worthwhile organization imho.

    Here's the link for Innocents

    http://publicliterature.org/pdf/3176.pdf
     
  14. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    I've read life on the Mississippi and the innocent s abroad. A very long time ago though. I loved Sawyer as a kid, the adventures were great, and seemed so exciting. I also loved the adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn TV series to, and I've talked about the books and show many times on here also
     
  15. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Must have been before my time or while I was on hiatus :redface:. I think the first book of his I read was Huckleberry Finn, but have read them all multiple times.
     
  16. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Musta being
     
  17. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    while I haven't rafted down the Mississippi or the Ohio rivers (A Major tributary mere blocks from my front door), I HAVE rafted a big part of the Blue river here in Indiana. Its more of a really HUGE creek than a river imho, but then I didn't have to worry about getting run over by a barge either!
     
  18. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    British slang : Anyone have any idea at all where the term "Loo" came from? And just WHAT is "Bangers and Mash" anyway? Guess I could look them up on Bing but would rather get the answer straight from the horses mouth as it were. Also, what is a "scouse" and why are they called that?
     
  19. FeeBee

    FeeBee Deck Sergeant

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    Isn't loo short for Lavatory?

    Bangers and Mash is a cartoon series abount brother monkeys who always get into trouble ;-)

    Its mashed spuds and sausages
     
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  20. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    Thank you @FeeBee and Good Morning to you! But I suppose its evening to you so Good Evening!
     
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