Explain That?

Discussion in 'RED DWARF UNIVERSE' started by Hollo_Marx, Sep 28, 2014.

  1. OurJud

    OurJud Deck Sergeant

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    No, both his arms are free. He takes the torch cutter, slices through his arm just below the elbow, then unscrews it at roughly the same place.
     
  2. Why do the waxdroids still act like their celebrities (Hitler: "this will be the final push, Mein Comrades", Elvis: "Thank you very much!") when its' been centuries since they broke their programming?
     
  3. Strat-tastic

    Strat-tastic Flight Co-Ordinator

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    About Timeslides, the developing process somehow captures the essence of what was being photographed, so a photo of a photo wouldn't work. You would walk into the scene and it would be only two dimensional; you'd be squashed into a piece of paper (if that's what you used to take the picture in the first place).
     
  4. STAR_PIRATE

    STAR_PIRATE First Technician

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    The thing is where talking about time travel, which is 4th dimensional travel... so the normal rules of space don't apply anymore.
     
  5. Simonr1978

    Simonr1978 Deck Sergeant

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    It could be that there's a locking plate/sleeve, lock nut or tab washer that needed removed or slackened first in order to unscrew the hand (You wouldn't want every Series 4000 with a slightly worn thread on the joint shedding limbs randomly after all) and in the absence of more appropriate tools or an assistant to help the easiest and quickest way to remove it was to use the laser cutter that just happened to be handy. Probably not the best design for use in an emergency, but this is Red Dwarf...
     
  6. Simonr1978

    Simonr1978 Deck Sergeant

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    My take on that is that their original programming was probably very limiting in terms of restricting them to performing a very limited range of actions repetitively (Think in terms of current animatronics that you may see as displays at some museums for example) with little or no variation or interactivity and probably limited to their particular exhibit or zone, when they were able to break their programming they did so in terms of breaking the restrictions so they could move freely and had much greater freedom of choice in terms of their actions.

    Their personalities were either pre-programmed and not broken in the same way or maybe were learned from materials and displays in their exhibits and zones (I imagine Hitler's wax droid reading through a poster or display board about himself and thinking "Oh, so that's what I'm supposed to be like is it? Ok then....").
     
  7. simulant37

    simulant37 Science Officer

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    Their programming & their personalities are 2 separate things...
     
  8. STAR_PIRATE

    STAR_PIRATE First Technician

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    For that to work they would have to have separate programs running, each doing different things... But you would still need a Kernel program (Master Program), to make sure everything works properly.
     
  9. simulant37

    simulant37 Science Officer

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    WTF?!? Seriously...its just a sitcom...:roll:
     
  10. STAR_PIRATE

    STAR_PIRATE First Technician

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    Well it is explain that... ;-)
     
  11. simulant37

    simulant37 Science Officer

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    I know...explaining fictional science...:roll:
     
  12. STAR_PIRATE

    STAR_PIRATE First Technician

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    Ah but some fictional things do end up becoming a reality at some point. Just look at the mobile phone, and the tablet computer now both are real items, but originally based on fictional things.
     
  13. simulant37

    simulant37 Science Officer

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    I know...
     
  14. OurJud

    OurJud Deck Sergeant

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    Works for me, mucka!
     
  15. magnusgreel

    magnusgreel First Technician

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    No, you agree with me. I'm championing science fiction over fantasy. I'm pointing out that the basic idea of Timeslides is wholly magical, and that playing around with and asking questions about the internal "logic" of a hopelessly magical concept is to accept the magical idea as a science fiction idea, when it isn't. It can't be made sense of in science fiction terms at all, unfortunately. "Mutated developing fluid" creates no link between any mere picture, which is just blotches of color, and the original subject of the picture. Peering into the logic of this, as if it can be made sense of, misses the point that it's all total nonsense.

    I don't reject the episode because of it, they squeak by if you don't think much and accept tech babble like "mutated developing fluid", but let's realize it's not really SF. Too many people these days are hazy about what the difference between science and magic IS. That's not good.

    Tomorrow, I suppose I have to start apologizing and doing some damage control. I don't want to be rude. I'm just trying to make a point effectively.
     
  16. magnusgreel

    magnusgreel First Technician

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    You have wandered too far into magical territory. I would ask that you take a few careful steps back, until you reach that fork in the road where you choose science or magic, and go the other way this time...

    Another show I've always liked is Dark Shadows. It's a given that magic exists in DS. It's interesting to discuss the internal "logic" of the magic there. If someone talked about "essence" there, it would be just fine. I don't think magical explanations for things that go on in a science fiction show are appropriate, though.

    What is this "essence"? Define it. What does it consist of? Do I have an "essence"? If so, what is it? It's a very vague word for a hopelessly vague and meaningless idea. If you're going to talk about "essences", you'd better be able to say what one is.

    If something can't be made sense of scientifically, I'm calling it magical, even if no wizards casting spells are involved.
     
  17. MG: another example of Science Fantasy is the 181 year old Lister in Future Echoes. Science belief is that average life expectancy - and Lister is an average person - will top out in the low nineties barring something that can change the rate of human aging itself being discovered.
     
  18. STAR_PIRATE

    STAR_PIRATE First Technician

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    I think with Listers diet of Vindaloo's, beer shakes, and lack of propper exercise... I very much doubt he would reach his early 70's, if he was a real average person.
     
  19. magnusgreel

    magnusgreel First Technician

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    Which presumably is exactly what happened in the show's universe. The fact that we don't know how to do a thing yet, doesn't make that thing fantasy. Science fiction is about projecting technology into the future, often VERY far. To do that, you have to include technologies we haven't begun to crack yet. You can't write a story set 200 or 300 years from now, and include only tech that we already know is right around the corner.

    This is the difference between science and science fiction. I've noticed some people lately criticizing SF for including anything we don't know how to do yet. That's a misunderstanding of what SF is. It's neither science nor fantasy. It's inbetween these two things. It's scientifically-based speculation. It becomes fantasy only when what we know about science, or just logic, tells us the supposed tech is absolutely impossible.

    I suscribe to Analog (audio form). It's a "hard science" magazine, especially strict about the science being at least possible. A number of stories in the last few years have had a premise of treatments and/or operations that result in immortality. That's incredibly optimistic, I'd say, but considering their general strictness about these things, must not be out of the realm of possibility.
     
  20. simulant37

    simulant37 Science Officer

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    Well then it must have been discovered in the universe of the show...:roll:
     

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