Hauntology - The pervasive oddness of our childhood

Discussion in 'THE AIGBURTH ARMS' started by Paul Taylor, Dec 11, 2017.

  1. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    A recent article in the Fortean Times magazine discussed a certain feeling among many of a certain generation that their childhoods, predominantly in the seventies and early eighties, contained an overall oddness, an understated but ever present weirdness which was reflected in popular culture at the time. While memories have a habit of being malleable, and some have suggested that this sense of disquiet manifests only when the past is compared to the brash and poppy present, some have netherless embraced this feeling, calling art inspired by it 'hauntology'. Few agree on its details, exactly what eras it covers, and those leading this movement are fine with that; it's very much a subjective perception. Some people lack any such sense of unease about their childhoods. Others have reported the same feeling about growing up in the mid-to-late eighties, so perhaps it's not a generation specific thing.

    Examples from my childhood would include the old series of The Moomins:

    ...perhaps the storytelling series Picture Box:

    ...and who can forget public information film, The Spirit of Dark and Lonely Water?


    More recently, I've been reminded of the series Near and Far. Watching this, remember it's the opening of a schools' geography programme, not a science fiction horror:


    Does anyone else have 'haunted' memories of this era, or similar memories from different times? Do images of Look and Read serials 'Dark Towers' and 'The Boy From Space' still prod at your consciousness occasionally? Does Noseybonk stalk your nightmares? Does Chocky really seem like a suitable subject for children's television? What else might you throw into this vat of disquiet, from past children's programmes to those aimed at a more mature audience; Sapphire and Steel? Tales of the Unexpected?
     
  2. Underdunn

    Underdunn Supply Officer

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    Have you ever seen the extended title sequence they unearthed a few years ago?



    Some people have suggested it's even creepier, but I don't see it myself.
     
  3. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    :lol:
    That's brilliant! All perfectly normal.
     
  4. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    O grew up in that time and there were some very weird and creepy things in TV. Noggin the nog, moonmins, noseybonk, mumfie etc. The thing is they're only odd because of the technology and the way they were filmed. They had a stilted look to them. Puppetry in particular had a creepy and awkward movement to it, and the puppets themselves are often cheap, thus giving them a more scary look. This explains a lot of so called creepiness. Also puppets, like punch and Judy, are thought of as creepy because they're mimicking human movement and expression.

    They were some unintentionally creepy shows, but a human love of horror and being scared tends to overexagerate the effects of this with time
     
  5. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Also a lot of adverts back in the old days were specifically designed to visually shock the young into the very real dangers of life that the innocence and naivety of youth may bypass, in a thirty second ad. Hence, the creepy voice of Donald pleasance and dark water, and the disturbingness of Charlie says and tufty the squirrel
     
  6. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    You could a could also add rent a ghost, dramarama and potty time to the list. Just be thankful you never saw this

     
  7. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    This is brilliant!

    Undoubtedly the state of technology at the time, grainy pictures and more primitive animation, lends much to the feel of disjointedness. But the opening titles and music of those times seems to fit with that weirdness. I offer the strange possessed shop of Bagpuss as an example of the utterly odd.
     
  8. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    oh yes, but the sheer cuteness of bagpuss, for me, outweighed that, plus the material he's made of makes me wanna hug him to bits. I do agree about the stiltedness of the music to. Noggin the nog was also Sweidsh or Nordic? The land of the midnight sun suicide, so go figure. You wanna see the horror movie, dead silence. Lots of people are feared of ventriloquists dummies for similar reasons. They seem stilted in movement, and they are are also pretty much independently 'alive', have a voice, and displaying human looks and movement.. As stated, this freaks a lot of people out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  9. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    you can add

    Ludwig
    phoenix and the flying carpet
    the box of delights, which is apt for the time of year
    children of the stones
    catweazel, which had a sorta scruffy creepiness to it


    Personally, I was always disturbed by worzel gummidge. firstly because an alive scarecrow is creepy as buggery, secondly because he would actually remove his head and swap it for another one, which is scary on so many different levels. lots of horror movies play on these common childhood fears to. Look at the success of 'it', and films like dead silence, puppet master, dolls, scarecrows, etc. You will also often find that many kids watched these programmes without fear, and it's only later in life, when the adult brain has more experience and understanding of fear and visual creepiness/stimuli that creepy attributes are retrospectively added to them
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  10. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    The Children of the Stones is a touchstone in discussions of this topic, definitely. I share your opinion of Worzel Gummidge. I loved the series but feared him changing his head.
     
  11. BigOleDummy

    BigOleDummy Console Officer

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    I've yet to see a show that I've seen or even heard of in this thread. Maybe this "feeling/theory" you espouse is limited to the U.K.? I have no uneasy thoughts/feelings about anything concerning my childhood, as least as pertains to what you allude to. My childhood "fears" were pretty much confined to if my teacher would find my stash of Playboy magazines I had to keep hidden at school. (Yes, he did. Yes, I had to have a Parent/Teacher/Child conference. Yes, that lead to one of the most awkward and embarrassing "conversation's"/yelling at's I've ever had with my Mother. But fear/dread, nope.)
     
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  12. Kittypaws

    Kittypaws Flight Co-Ordinator

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    ... noseybonk..?
     
  13. Nikki the Great

    Nikki the Great Flight Co-Ordinator

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    I was terrified of most of the villains from Care Bears. Shutup.
     
  14. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Lol, but who wouldn't be terrified with a name and look of Tenderheart bear!!
     
  15. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    You wouldn't have heard of them big old, they're virtually all British from the seventies and eighties
     
  16. Pembers

    Pembers Console Officer

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    Pob was a creepy little thing.

     
  17. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    I don't recall ever seeing Pob, but it may have been after my time.

    Noseybonk was a 'comedy' character appearing in segments of the tv programme Jigsaw.
     
  18. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Console Officer

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    I don't remember any US programmes with the same level of weirdness. European, certainly, but not US.
     
  19. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    What about hr puff n stuff, his name was druggy before you even got onto the content.

    Small wonder, that weird robot kid
     
  20. neilold

    neilold Flight Co-Ordinator

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    Are you seriously telling me you didn't find peppermint park even slightly disturbing big old?
     

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