New Dave Series - Guesswork and Rumours

Discussion in 'RED DWARF UNIVERSE' started by Andrew, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    I find it slightly ironic you mention this, an instructor had to work with me on the same thing. I agree advice, especially without charge, would be helpful. The question is would Twitter be the forum Mr. Caine (or any other) would use to share his tips? I just don't see it happening...:?

    Yes, some actors like the eyes being on them...some to the extreme (here goes the biting of the tongue). There are others that are painfully shy and even reclusive outside of acting that are successful and extremely talented. It is safe to say all choose to be artistic emotionally/physically. I can see your point of view. However, I think it may have more to do with the fact actors are trained to be self-aware of what they are doing and it filters into their comments. We are simply doing what we know how to; sharing what we are doing/feeling in words instead of action. It also brings out other annoying habits like staring in public, which seems quite off to the person being stared at, but most actors are fascinated by people (perhaps even closet psychologists/sociologists). So while verbalizing the self, there is a lot of focus and energy that is directed at others...in the form of quietly researching,observing and reading what others have tweeted themselves to soak it up silently. Acute skills in observation are just as important to the craft to develop personal empathy with the character. Again, other actors may see things differently...I may be only understanding my own motivations and otherwise speaking general self-centered nonsense. ;-)

    From how you noticed the differences in tweets, I can't help but wonder if you are a closet actor, Andrew. :-) Perhaps your stated annoyance with actor tweets is simply a cry for your inner performer to burst forth. :shock:....:lol:
     
  2. Andrew

    Andrew Executive Officer

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    Well indeed - as we've said, the very point that began the discussion, that doesn't seem to be happening.

    Well sure, absolutely. (And I don't think the painfully shy ones are tweeting so much, so already we're filtered into the sub-category 'actors who happily tweet'.) So, like people who think Twitter gives them a chance to tell the world what they're having for breakfast, people who forever tweet in order to just keep on expressing just don't do much for me. I don't get much out of that feed. If others do, that's fine for them!

    And yes, observation's a biggie - but that's rarely making their feed interesting, because the observation aspect isn't being reported or discussed. They may even get useful material from reading interesting tweets while not being interesting themselves. (Which brings us back to what I said before - actors need the skill to 'understand' far more than they need the skill to 'explain'.)

    But, to be clear, this remains a twitter context thing. I'm not saying I dislike actors or anything ridiculous like that. Merely - and very specifically - illustrating why I rarely follow 'em online.

    Oh. Dear. God. No.

    Nah, I don't even enjoy it when I show up as an extra, much less when I'm given a line. (Though I did have a blast on the IT Crowd locations tweeting observations of the division between the paid supporting artists - pretty girls with inane conversation and me-me-me attitudes - and the fan-extras, who were fascinating, warm, welcoming geek boys and girls.)

    But I'm a writer and a script editor (the RD website hasn't been my main job for a long time now). And - as per the example above -
    while writers share the actor's interest in observation...we also have the tools to articulate that observation in written form, and the urge to report it to the interested and curious.

    My feed's full of nonsense like this. If I were a closet actor, I'd have noticed it...but I'd be tweeting about my dog. :-)
     
  3. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    It sounds like a anti-addiction support group when you word it that way. :-)

    Likely you carried yourself as somebody who knew your way around a set but were quiet about your experience; they were sharing their experience, assuming you would do the same and they could judge your usefulness in landing them another gig. There are always a few that use that...I understand your frustration with this. This is also a symptom of the down time on set; boredom! Even stuffing envelopes for a not-for-profit (in the US it would double as a tax write-off for the project). I think most actors would gladly do that instead of flapping our jaws to stay alert.

    Touché...:-)
     
  4. Andrew

    Andrew Executive Officer

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    I'm afraid you've guessed quite wrong! I carried myself like a script editor on-set as an extra - as unassuming and tiny as can be!

    Importantly, I didn't even speak to these girls directly - I didn't much care to. Everything I heard and reported was purely observational. Watching them as we shot these club scenes, and in the long gaps in between. The way they bragged to each other, watching them sneer at the wonderful, warm, lovely nerds. Guys and girls who were there unpaid, having been invited to help via Twitter and costumed to appear geeky regardless of whether they really were.

    I will say this: the geek girls were ten times cuter, sexier and more interesting than the model-actress-whatevers.

    Ooh, hang on, got my Twitter archive somewhere. Right, yes, here's what I tweeted - over the course of a few hours - on this subject:

    - A Model-Actress-Whatever is dissing the pointlessness of Twitter and asking ITC extras if they're geeks. No part of this is unamusing to me.

    - MAW line: "You were in Eastenders?" "What? Oh yeah, totally." "What did you play?" "I was 'pretty girl'."

    - MAW line: (Holding size 4 stomach) "God, I look pregnant."

    - MAW line: "Where did you get your shoes?" Reply: "Wardrobe."
     
  5. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    I did guess wrong; picked the norm that I see. Quoted conversation sounds harmless (reference to asking extras if they are geeks sounds rude), ladies worry about their tummy shape because there is the fear of not being as employable (I have heard the pregnant one many times). If they are models before actors, their entire career/income is wrapped up in how they look. Many ladies escape to the bathroom to group vent on things asthetic (hair, pooch, shoes making feet look huge).

    The sneering is ridiculous. I'm surprised nobody confronted them on it. My experience has been usually somebody calls a person out for being rude. Especially to volunteers on set, my understanding is most productions will go out of their way to preserve those contacts? Next time quietly take them aside and politely point out the importance of those volunteers?
     
  6. Andrew

    Andrew Executive Officer

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    Well, I meant you'd guessed wrong about who spoke to whom. The guess about how I carried myself and how they spoke to me - that was sll I meant.

    I'm not saying I don't understand what generated those comments. They're just interesting and amusing observations.

    Called out? On a working set? Really? So long as it's small and not affecting the running of the shoot I've never seen it go that way. Production is a constant hotbed of ego - if everyone who displayed some attitude to someone else was told off nobody would have time to shoot anything!

    (Actually you've just reminded me of two stories - that I can't tell, sadly - one about supporting artists the other about an entire bad-attitude department. In the case of the latter, someone high-up did eventually step in. But it took a lot more than a single day and a few sneers before it happened!)

    Anyway - not my job to quietly take anyone aside and tell them anything. I'm the script editor, I'm not involved in casting. It would be seen as causing trouble, and overstepping my bounds, not solving anything.
     
  7. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    Called out yes, telling off sometimes yes and sometimes no. It usually doesn't take much and can help productivity. Sometimes a simple, "Wow, we are so lucky to have such talented volunteers - without them this shoot just wouldn't work." is enough to redirect the energy. Other times, I've seen very direct tactics. A simple comment is usually enough. Once I witnessed just the word "Catty!" after a talent was negatively commenting on an extra. If it offends your volunteers, then they likely do not want to come back again which is terrible if they are needed for a few days. It can spread a bad attitude across the whole set. Some spats are worth ignoring (two people that just pick at each other equally), some not. With volunteers, I think it should be addressed. I'm not saying run up and chew the girl out, I am a big fan of redirecting to something positive. It works well with children too. :-)

    My personality though...I know if somebody thought I was being a brat I would want somebody to bring it to my attention so I could apologize or learn from it.
     
  8. Andrew

    Andrew Executive Officer

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    Oh I'm not saying it shouldn't happen - just that it rarely does in my experience. I'm becoming awfully jealous of these warmer, balanced productions!

    I haven't really asked, what kind of stuff have you been doing?

    (As for wanting to know so you could apologise and learn - I would, too. But believe me, if you were there you;'d agree - these particular examples weren't interested in that kind of feedback.)
     
  9. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    There is being wise enough to know when it is not worth it either, as you pointed out. :-)

    Mostly commercial and independent films (nothing on the scale of being a Red Dwarf star). I was waiting to get an agent until I felt competent again (over four years off), which I think I have enough positive feedback to make that move. I have it narrowed down and just need to get over this cold so I can call and actually talk to the guy. First music video shoot is coming up soon - a new artist. The hardest part about Seattle is acting does not pay well, and I have an agreement with my husband that all gigs will meet a certain pay level (gas + babysitter + a little extra). Until I finish the agent thing (my former one retired), things are going to move slowly. My demo reel is on somebody's desk to finish; medical emergency on their end. I have a few things in post that I am waiting to get my hands on so I have an electronic copy of something recent. Just having a blast the entire time :-) I would love if I made enough money so my husband could have a part-time job instead (he works ridiculous hours to take care of us), but I do not see that happening in the Seattle market.

    Get me an email address and I can send you a resume.
     
  10. Andrew

    Andrew Executive Officer

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    Somehow I didn't see this post until just now - sorry!

    Seattle, hmm? Wondering if the loveliness you've experienced is related to the location. Bit more indie, bit less precious...

    Totally get why it's tough - hard to balance a family and anything, much less something that asks so much of you. Plus America (from the outside) seems to make it much harder to thrive in the media outside of LA and New York. Can't imagine a writer in the UK being told "If you don't leave Exeter, you'll never work on network TV", yet that's so often the advice writers away from the coasts are being given.

    Oh, and my email's on my website: andrewellard.com
     
  11. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    No worries, you work! I am typing while waiting for the children to finish their worksheets. :-)

    I live between the Portland and Seattle markets, but Seattle is the one I know best. It is harder to get booked on gigs in Portland now. Requirements on providing proof of residency for crew/talent for the project to qualify for certain in state incentives/tax credits for doing business. Washington is doing the same.

    LA is likely going to have to be considered at some point. Aside from being a mom, being on set is all I want to do. Busy times in the Seattle/Portland markets come and go, we are crawling out of a long period of slow business. Things seem to be picking up again...though paying less than before because so many of the actors here will work for free *insert pout*

    Checking out your website now, :shock: and I am impressed with the comments others have left for you! Clearly you know your stuff. :-) Congrats to you!
     
  12. dazsin

    dazsin First Technician

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    New series confirmed??!?!?!

    http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/cult/news/a286062/red-dwarf-exec-confirms-new-series.html
     
  13. Andrew

    Andrew Executive Officer

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    I love how they edit all the qualifications out of the quotes, and ignore that this is stuff Doug's already said on Twitter. Just brilliant.

    Also: not an exec.
     
  14. Starbugger27

    Starbugger27 Third Technician

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    I have recently joined the forums in order to discuss the possibility of a new series. Reading the previous comments has been really entertaining and has given me a good insight into what I've been missing since last reading of the BTE excitement.

    Personally, I'm completely optimistic about a new series. Doug has put his heart and soul into this series, and for him to do anything less than give it his best is unlikely. The assuring viewing figures for Back to Earth should have got a series in the bag immediately, and I'm sure the main issues are going to be drafting contracts for the cast, and the more obvious issue of funding.

    The real question is, what does Doug have planned for the next series? And will Dave be able to support the RD team enough to make it a reality? I'm pretty sure if Doug can't take RD to where he wants it to be, then it's better left alone. I'd hate to see a half-assed series being made.

    I certainly have my fingers crossed, though!
     
  15. menacexp

    menacexp Second Technician

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    110% agree with this idea!!! I think this would be a fun idea to purrrr-sue for sure!
     
  16. drumjay

    drumjay Catering Officer Fan Club Team

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    I've wondered if the new Series would contain any part of the Movie script, since it's already an idea and possibly written down.
    But then I think that Movie structure would be totally different to television comedy drama, so I've given up that idea!
    So it will be new, that's exciting!

    I just wonder if it will follow the format of on ship Red Dwarf or Starbug? Departing and returning to create the adventure, as a trusted exercise. I've always liked this idea, but we need a drive. A missing person, a lost ship mate.

    I've also liked the idea of looking through the eyes of a character, not always done on Red Dwarf. Kryten can record, everything it seems, so why not see the Series through the eyes or memory of Kryten, we see a playback or a recording of the adventure, not from a fly on the wall but an insider. The evidence could be shown to a previous accident or story without giving away the final answer.

    I also love a story arc, the ship is split into parts, they have to rescue each part before they can continue (basic)
    I just want to see each Episode individual but a running theme, and a cliff hanger.

    Don't want much do I ?
     
  17. drumjay

    drumjay Catering Officer Fan Club Team

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    Exclusive shot of scenery in Red Dwarf X

    Timber!
     
  18. Bluey

    Bluey Science Officer

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    A few planks of wood. Very nice, James.
     
  19. supercat

    supercat Console Officer

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    We've got enough planks round here!! ;-)
     
  20. yeckel

    yeckel Console Officer

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    I miss debating with Andrew... :-(
     

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